Customs implementation delay could help freight forwarders achieve needed changes

By Alex Binkley

A delay by Canada Border Services Agency in the implementation of an electronic tracking system for freight forwarders handling imports and exports gives Canadian International Freight Forwarders Association more time to help the Agency get the process right.

After several years of working on the implementation of its e-Manifest system, which is aimed at expediting the movement of freight through customs facilities at land borders as well as ports and airports, CBSA announced May 23 a year-long pause in implementation as it tried to fix its operational problems.

Continue reading

Business development and mentoring

By Guy M. Tombs

I recently stayed at the Rex Hotel in central Saigon, now Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, attending the excellent CLC Projects Logistics Conference. It was a time to take stock, not only of the vast changes in the world since April 30 1975, when the U.S. Government pulled out of Saigon in dramatic fashion, but also of changes in my own life since that period. I lunched one day at the nearby Hotel Continental, vividly described in Graham Greene’s great 1955 novel The Quiet American.

Continue reading

Report on the Shipping Federation of Canada’s Annual Conference

By Brian Dunn

The geo-economic landscape is changing with new trade routes and the threat of renegotiations of trade agreements. Companies will be forced to rethink their business and logistics models, according to a trade industry expert.

For example, dry bulk/agri exports by rail to Mexico could be replaced by trade with other South American countries which could benefit the shipping industry, suggested Henriette Van Niekerk, Director & Global Head of Dry Bulk Analysis at London-based shipbroker Clarksons Platou. And with the U.S. slapping a 400 per cent tariff on Chinese steel imports and 200 per cent on Japanese steel, that steel could be replaced by steel imports from Russia or Brazil, Ms. Van Niekerk said at the Shipping Federation of Canada’s 15th Annual Conference in Montreal.

Continue reading

Canadian marine shipping endorses international CO2 reduction targets

Chamber of Marine Commerce (CMC) is endorsing proposed international targets to reduce marine shipping’s carbon emissions per tonne-km by 50 per cent by 2050 in order to match the ambition of the Paris Agreement on climate change.

“Canadian Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway shipowners are committed to environmental protection and fully endorse this proactive global approach to reducing the carbon footprint of marine shipping,” said Bruce Burrows, President of CMC. “Similar to the airline industry, marine shipping is an international business and it is important that we have one global solution to the challenge of climate change.”

Continue reading

Airlines and shipping step up to maintain supply lines as Qatar battles blockade

By Alex Lennane

As Qatar battles major boycotts, Oman’s ports of Sohar and Salalah are set to handle its regional sea trade, while airlines, including Iran Air, are carrying large quantities of food imports. Since early June, when seven countries cut ties to Qatar, carriers have been working out new routings to avoid a direct link between the UAE’s ports and Qatar’s. With container hubs at Jebel Ali, Khar Fakkan, Fujairah and Abu Dhabi no longer able to ship directly to Qatar, Oman is set to become the key transit point.

Continue reading

First freight train from UK sets off as China-Europe rail services soar

By Alex Lennane

The first train from the UK to China left London Gateway on April 10, heading for Yiwu, where it arrived on 27 April, with 30 containers carrying whisky, soft drinks, vitamins and pharmaceuticals. Rail services between Europe and China have seen a surge in volumes as services grow and shippers take advantage of the cost and speed benefits available.

Continue reading

A few components of federal transport plans are taking shape

By Alex Binkley

A railway service bill, and action on a budget proposal to track transportation trends appear to be the federal government’s first initiatives connected to its Transport 2030 action plan. Meanwhile it’s moving ahead with proposals from last year’s $1.5 billion Oceans Protection Plan to acquire icebreaking and ship-towing assistance. Transport Minister Marc Garneau has said he’ll introduce legislation this spring to implement seven key measures recommended by the report on the Canada Transport Act review released last year.

Continue reading

Emerson urges big-picture view of trade corridors

By Alex Binkley

Don’t let discussions of improved trade and transportation corridors become mired in debates about which infrastructure projects are most important, says David Emerson.

The former federal cabinet minister and head of the group that produced a sweeping review of Canadian transportation policy released last year, says it would be a mistake to focus solely on the state of railways, bridges, pipelines and power transmission lines.

Continue reading

Minister Marc Garneau points to Seaway’s pivotal role as 59th Seaway season begins

The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation, joined by the U.S. Saint Lawrence Development Corporation, marked the opening of its 59th navigation season with a special tribute to marine shipping’s substantial contribution to Canada’s economic development and quality of life. CSL St-Laurent, the first ship to transit the St. Lambert lock in 2017, featured a monumental work of art work commissioned by Montreal-headquartered Canada Steamship Lines, a division of the CSL Group, as a tribute to Canada’s 150th anniversary and the 375th of the City of Montreal.

Continue reading

Technology driving freight industry swiftly up the on-ramp

By R. Bruce Striegler

By July of this year, the world’s first passenger drone aircraft will be transporting individuals over Dubai. Chinese-based Ehang unveiled the world’s first self-flying, electric aircraft prototype, or more accurately, passenger drone, at the 2016 Las Vegas’ Consumer Electronics Show. The drone can carry one passenger, weighing up to 100 kilograms, and can stay airborne for 30 minutes on one charge, and fly at a maximum speed of 100 kph. Although Ehang claims it can reach altitudes of 3,500 metres, the vehicle flies quite low, between 300 to 500 metres. The passenger uses a touchscreen to select a destination, and the drone is then “auto-piloted” by a command center.

Continue reading

Page 1 of 5612345...102030...Last »