Nova Scotia’s Nautical Institute has been training young men and women for careers at sea for over 140 years

By Tom Peters

Part of Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC), the Nautical Institute, originally started in Halifax in 1872 as the Halifax Marine School, is located in Port Hawkesbury on the Strait of Canso and draws students from all over the world.

The face of the commercial marine industry has changed drastically in the past several years with ships’ sizes of both container vessels and bulk carriers reaching levels not anticipated 30 years ago, and with the constant evolution of technology.

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Report on the Shipping Federation of Canada’s Annual Conference

By Brian Dunn

The geo-economic landscape is changing with new trade routes and the threat of renegotiations of trade agreements. Companies will be forced to rethink their business and logistics models, according to a trade industry expert.

For example, dry bulk/agri exports by rail to Mexico could be replaced by trade with other South American countries which could benefit the shipping industry, suggested Henriette Van Niekerk, Director & Global Head of Dry Bulk Analysis at London-based shipbroker Clarksons Platou. And with the U.S. slapping a 400 per cent tariff on Chinese steel imports and 200 per cent on Japanese steel, that steel could be replaced by steel imports from Russia or Brazil, Ms. Van Niekerk said at the Shipping Federation of Canada’s 15th Annual Conference in Montreal.

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Canadian marine shipping endorses international CO2 reduction targets

Chamber of Marine Commerce (CMC) is endorsing proposed international targets to reduce marine shipping’s carbon emissions per tonne-km by 50 per cent by 2050 in order to match the ambition of the Paris Agreement on climate change.

“Canadian Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway shipowners are committed to environmental protection and fully endorse this proactive global approach to reducing the carbon footprint of marine shipping,” said Bruce Burrows, President of CMC. “Similar to the airline industry, marine shipping is an international business and it is important that we have one global solution to the challenge of climate change.”

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French navy contract puts federal contracts in Ocean Group sights

By Mark Cardwell

Ocean Group has landed a four-year contract for the repair and maintenance of a small French Navy vessel that patrols the waters around the sparsely-populated French archipelago of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, just south of Newfoundland. A spokesperson for the Quebec City-based dredging, towing, salvage and ship repair company hopes the modest contract with a foreign power will help land larger ones with the federal government here at home.

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‘Enough is enough’ – CMA CGM unveils cancellation fee for no-show boxes

By Gavin van Marle

CMA CGM will levy a cancellation fee on European shippers and forwarders that do not deliver their containers for booked services to Indian subcontinent, Middle East Gulf and Red Sea ports. In remarks that echo some of the problems carriers were having with space on the eastbound trades out of Europe, the French carrier said “no-shows” were preventing it serving other shippers.

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Shippers squeezing margins ‘pushed carriers toward bigger ships and alliances’

By Alex Lennane

Container shipping lines shrugged off accusations that bigger ships and alliances would lead to less choice and less supply chain resilience, and argued that instead, shippers had brought these changes upon themselves. Olaf Merk, of the International Transport Forum, explained to delegates at Transport Logistic in Munich how the recent changes in the liner industry could lead to a negative outcome for the supply chain. “There is a pathway where bigger ships and vertical integration give rise to the concentration of ports and cargo, and they will have less leverage as the shipping lines get more powerful.”

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Airlines and shipping step up to maintain supply lines as Qatar battles blockade

By Alex Lennane

As Qatar battles major boycotts, Oman’s ports of Sohar and Salalah are set to handle its regional sea trade, while airlines, including Iran Air, are carrying large quantities of food imports. Since early June, when seven countries cut ties to Qatar, carriers have been working out new routings to avoid a direct link between the UAE’s ports and Qatar’s. With container hubs at Jebel Ali, Khar Fakkan, Fujairah and Abu Dhabi no longer able to ship directly to Qatar, Oman is set to become the key transit point.

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Ports of Georgia and Virginia get green light for talks on box terminal alliance

By Gavin van Marle

The US east coast port authorities of Georgia and Virginia have been given a green light from the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) for discussions on “a variety of operational and commercial topics”, in what is likely to be the latest port alliance development. Georgia and Virginia, which respectively oversee the container gateways of Savannah and Norfolk, have drawn up an East Coast Gateway Terminal Agreement “to exchange information related to the best use of their wharves, berths and cargo handling equipment, all to the benefit of the shipping public”.

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ULCVs will ply the transpacific trade, but the ports are not ready for them

By Mike Wackett

Despite a near doubling of the number of 13,000 TEU-or-above vessels deployed on the transpacific Asia-US west coast trade this year, the Los Angeles-Long Beach port complex remains unprepared for the introduction of 18,000 TEU-plus ULCVs, according to Drewry. In its latest analysis of the route, Drewry Maritime Research said the number of 13,000 TEU vessels on the transpacific increased from 21 in January to 36 in May as carriers cascaded more large tonnage from Asia-Europe trades to accommodate fresh deliveries of ULCVs. And the lines are likely to cascade even more large tonnage to the transpacific as more ULCVs for Asia-Europe are received.

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