Port of Thunder Bay volumes are on track to rival previous three ‘excellent’ seasons

There’s a predominant theme in the Port of Thunder Bay these days: momentum. Many port industries and initiatives are prospering, from the rise in bulk commodity shipments to the setting of cargo volume records in the project and breakbulk sector.

Cargo volumes in the Port of Thunder Bay were very strong in May, bolstered by significant grain shipments and decade-high potash volumes. Year-to-date, volumes of most of the Port’s key cargoes are well above average.

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Thunder Bay’s resurgence of steel and heavy-lift

In 2004, Thunder Bay Port Authority implemented a new strategic direction, placing substantial effort toward attracting oversized project cargo through Keefer Terminal, the Authority’s general cargo facility which is located centrally in the natural deepwater port. Thirteen years and over $15 millions of investment later, Keefer Terminal is now a busy project cargo hub, handling bi-weekly shipments of dimensional cargo, both inbound and outbound for the Western Canadian market. From scale-tipping pressure vessels to windmill towers, blades and nacelles, Thunder Bay has earned a reputation as a reliable solution for dimensional cargo challenges.

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Richardson to celebrate 100 years at the Port of Thunder Bay

Next year, it will be 100 years since James Richardson handpicked the location for Richardson International’s port terminal in Thunder Bay. In 2018, “Richardson is proud to be celebrating its 100th anniversary in Thunder Bay,” says Gerry Heinrichs, Director of Terminal Operations at Richardson International’s Thunder Bay Terminal. The port is a hub for grain shipments to the U.S., Mexico and South America.

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New life breathed into Thunder Bay Shipyard

Heddle Marine Service Inc. (Heddle) and Fabmar Metals Inc. (Fabmar) have formed a strategic partnership with the goal of restoring the historic Thunder Bay Shipyard to a position of prominence on the Great Lakes.

Fabmar has already successfully executed several projects at the shipyard, including the dry docking of a local tug named the tug George N Carlton in November 2016 for Gravel Lakes as well as a more recent dry docking of a local tug named the Miseford in June 2017 for Thunder Bay Tug.

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Continuous learning is a cornerstone of CIFFA services

By Alex Binkley

A wide variety of training and professional upgrading courses have long been a cornerstone of the services Canadian International Freight Forwarders Association has offered its members.

In keeping up with the times, and taking advantage of modern communications technology, CIFFA has teamed up with Schulich School of Business at York University to offer an online version of courses for its Professional Freight Forwarder designation, says Stephen McDermott, CIFFA’s Director of Education and Marketing.

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Customs implementation delay could help freight forwarders achieve needed changes

By Alex Binkley

A delay by Canada Border Services Agency in the implementation of an electronic tracking system for freight forwarders handling imports and exports gives Canadian International Freight Forwarders Association more time to help the Agency get the process right.

After several years of working on the implementation of its e-Manifest system, which is aimed at expediting the movement of freight through customs facilities at land borders as well as ports and airports, CBSA announced May 23 a year-long pause in implementation as it tried to fix its operational problems.

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Business development and mentoring

By Guy M. Tombs

I recently stayed at the Rex Hotel in central Saigon, now Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, attending the excellent CLC Projects Logistics Conference. It was a time to take stock, not only of the vast changes in the world since April 30 1975, when the U.S. Government pulled out of Saigon in dramatic fashion, but also of changes in my own life since that period. I lunched one day at the nearby Hotel Continental, vividly described in Graham Greene’s great 1955 novel The Quiet American.

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Pilotage review will undertake a broad examination of the service

By Alex Binkley

After a protracted preparation phase, a review of the Pilotage Act will take a broad look at the navigation service and whether modern technology should lead to changes. The review will be chaired by Marc Grégoire, a former Commissioner of the Canadian Coast Guard and former Assistant Deputy Minister of Safety and Security at Transport Canada. His mandate is to focus on tariffs, service delivery, governance, and dispute resolution to ensure safe, efficient and environmentally responsible marine pilotage services into the future.

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Report on the Shipping Federation of Canada’s Annual Conference

By Brian Dunn

The geo-economic landscape is changing with new trade routes and the threat of renegotiations of trade agreements. Companies will be forced to rethink their business and logistics models, according to a trade industry expert.

For example, dry bulk/agri exports by rail to Mexico could be replaced by trade with other South American countries which could benefit the shipping industry, suggested Henriette Van Niekerk, Director & Global Head of Dry Bulk Analysis at London-based shipbroker Clarksons Platou. And with the U.S. slapping a 400 per cent tariff on Chinese steel imports and 200 per cent on Japanese steel, that steel could be replaced by steel imports from Russia or Brazil, Ms. Van Niekerk said at the Shipping Federation of Canada’s 15th Annual Conference in Montreal.

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Canadian marine shipping endorses international CO2 reduction targets

Chamber of Marine Commerce (CMC) is endorsing proposed international targets to reduce marine shipping’s carbon emissions per tonne-km by 50 per cent by 2050 in order to match the ambition of the Paris Agreement on climate change.

“Canadian Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway shipowners are committed to environmental protection and fully endorse this proactive global approach to reducing the carbon footprint of marine shipping,” said Bruce Burrows, President of CMC. “Similar to the airline industry, marine shipping is an international business and it is important that we have one global solution to the challenge of climate change.”

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