Port of Hamilton: Sustainability in the spotlight

Port of Hamilton: Sustainability in the spotlight

Stewardship of the land and water around Hamilton’s port lands is fundamental to the Port of Hamilton’s strategy and operations. This year, HPA will begin the process of outlining a robust Sustainability program, that will track and report publicly on financial, social and environmental metrics. This program will build on a range of environmental initiatives that are already delivering important positive results:

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Port of Hamilton: New links in Ontario’s agri-food supply chain

This spring, a brand new grain export terminal at the Port of Hamilton opens its doors to begin accepting product from Ontario farms. The state-of-the-art $50 million G3 Canada Ltd. terminal will create necessary transportation capacity to help Ontario producers deliver their corn, wheat and soybeans to markets around the globe.

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Emerson urges big-picture view of trade corridors

By Alex Binkley

Don’t let discussions of improved trade and transportation corridors become mired in debates about which infrastructure projects are most important, says David Emerson.

The former federal cabinet minister and head of the group that produced a sweeping review of Canadian transportation policy released last year, says it would be a mistake to focus solely on the state of railways, bridges, pipelines and power transmission lines.

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G3 constructs first new grain terminal since the 1960’s at Port of Vancouver

By R. Bruce Striegler

Responding to a question as to why G3 Global Holdings is proceeding with a new Vancouver grain terminal, Brett Malkoske, G3’s Vice-President, Business Development and Communications says, “Straight-up need, Canadian farmers are some of the best in the world at what they do, which is grow grain.” He points out that production in Western Canada in particular has been growing at a fairly constant pace for some time. “Due to our smaller population, domestic consumption of these goods is relatively stagnant, so a substantial amount of what we’re growing has to be exported, and that growth is coming from Asia.”

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A wave of optimism with Seaway opening

By Alex Binkley

When it comes to the prospects for a new navigation season on the St. Lawrence Seaway and Great Lakes, Terence Bowles and Craig Middlebrook have to sound optimistic. This year might justify upbeat comments the President and CEO of The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation and the Deputy Administrator of Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation offer in separate interviews.

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Trump’s Arctic: Making America Great in the region

By K. Joseph Spears

Has America’s Arctic policy changed with the election of President Donald J. Trump? His November 2016 election came as a surprise to political pundits and mainstream media. The previous Administration of Barack Obama made climate change a cornerstone of U.S. Arctic policy. Obama’s Arctic policy was the subject of articles in the March and November 2016 issues of Canadian Sailings. It is an understatement that the new President has been less vigorous in his approach to climate science and the underlying causes of climate change. Whether this impacts U.S. Arctic policy remains to be seen: it is still very early days. President Trump has made it clear that he wants to make America great again and thicken the borders of continental America and this must also include the northern border along the coast of Alaska. These efforts will impact Canada.

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Trudeau’s Arctic: Warming up to the region

K. Joseph Spears

Canada’s Liberal government was elected October 2015 and is now in the second year of its mandate. A picture is emerging of the Trudeau government policy in the Arctic. Canada and the United States entered into a Joint Policy Statement on the Arctic when Prime Minister Trudeau attended his first state visit to Washington while President Obama was still in office. The joint declaration was based upon the foundation of climate change and science-based decision-making that provided a guidepost for resource development and sustainable shipping activities, to name two of the issues addressed in the joint statement. This joint declaration is the subject matter of an article in a March 2016 issue of Canadian Sailings. With the new Trump Administration, the status of this joint declaration remains undetermined, especially given the new Administration’s avoidance of statements related to climate change.

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A mandatory Polar Code – How does it affect shipping?

By Captain David (Duke) Snider, FNI FRGS

The IMO’s mandatory International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters (Polar Code) came into effect in January 2017. How does the Polar Code make the playing field of Arctic Shipping different? The biggest difference is the mandatory nature of this new IMO instrument. After a series of voluntary polar shipping guidelines that have existed since the 1990s, the Polar Code is the first mandatory IMO instrument focused on shipping in the Arctic and Antarctic. The new Code sets in place baseline goal-based standards for design, construction, operation and crewing, and environmental protection measures for ships operating in Polar Waters. In the coming months, governments will be required to bring their national regulations and requirements into line with the Polar Code. Transport Canada is currently in the process of doing exactly that, consulting with stakeholders on changes to the Arctic Shipping Pollution Prevention Regulations to enable compliance with the Polar Code onboard Canadian ships and in Canadian waters.

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Quebec Port Terminals anticipates major growth in its Arctic operations

By Mark Cardwell

When Jack Watt took over as operations manager at the Quebec Port Terminals (QPT) terminal in Bécancour in 2008, the loading and unloading of ships bound for a fledgling open-pit gold mine in Canada’s Low Arctic was a small but promising part of the facility’s business. That is set to change, however, as Agnico Eagle begins to invest more than US$1.2 billion into opening two new mines in the same region.

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Desgagnés’ Arctic business is thriving

By Brian Dunn

It was another challenging season in the Far North for Desgagnés Transarctik, but not nearly as bad as in 2015 when Arctic shipping was plagued by unusual stationary ice and wind conditions that delayed the delivery of several shiploads of cargo. “This year was not as bad in Iqaluit and Pangnirtung, but there was lots of ice early in the season in Ungava Bay where we lost precious days,” said Waguih Rayes, General Manager, Desgagnés Transarctik. “It was a similar situation on the East Coast of Hudson’s Bay.”

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